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Faith in Children's Literature: Method 3

Welcome to the third method in our series on faith in children’s literature! We’ve discussed using allegory and including Biblical values as methods for sharing faith. Today, we’re diving into the genre of Christian children’s books.

Method 3: Niche Down to Christian Children’s Books

There are publishers for overtly Christian children’s books. Unfortunately, some school libraries may not be able to carry these books because of their overtly evangelistic message. If you choose this route, know that your book won’t have the same reach as books using the first two methods. Of course, some of my favorite overtly Christian books as a child came from the now-defunct Mission City Press. I loved the Elsie Dinsmore series! It blended historical settings with problems and feelings I related to. However, as an adult, I read a rather harsh review of the series. I suddenly realized that the reviewer made an excellent point.

The problem with the Elsie Dinsmore series stems from the main character created back in 1867 by Martha Finley. While Elsie is sweet and lovable like a little puppy needing protection, her silent “Christian” rebellion allows her to be run over by her domineering family members. Yes, Jesus honors meekness, and Peter recommends a submissive attitude in a wife, but the examples of meek submission in the Bible are not weak. Jesus turns the other cheek, but also flips tables at injustice. Peter gets arrested, but his and John’s singing breaks open the jail. Their meek submission represents controlled strength, not beaten-down surrender.

Therefore, if we decide to niche down to an overtly Christian book for impressionable young readers, let’s be cautious. When we oversimplify issues of faith or create nearly perfect main characters, we set a standard that the child reader aspires to but can never attain in this broken world. I suggest we embrace our imperfections and teach our children that God gives grace when we stumble. We will still feel and hurt when we let God lead our lives, but He also gives us hope and purpose.

Would you rather publish your children’s book with a Christian publisher or a “secular” publisher? Let me know in the comments!

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